Let's Talk about CBD Oil, Marijuana, Cannabis and Hemp

CBD is a hot topic right now. Many people don't understand it and mistake it for medicinal cannabis, which it's not. CDB oil or cannabidiol is derived from industrial hemp and contains less than 0.3% THC or tetrahydrocannabinol. In order for a CBD oil to be considered THC free according to the federal standard, it must contain no more than 0.3%. It does not produce the "high" that is associated with cannabis because it contains only trace amounts of THC, which is the component of the plant that produces any psychoactive effect. CBD products, made from industrial hemp, are sold nationwide at local markets and large chain stores like Costco and Whole Foods.

CBD oil is typically used to help with anxiety, depression, brain fog, pain, inflammation, low energy, sleep issues, and provide a general sense of well being. THC oil is something completely different than CBD oil and is typically used for those with cancer to help combat the horrific side effects that can happen during treatment, like debilitating nausea, lack of appetite, migraines and general pain. Studies are showing that THC has been nothing short of a miracle for some with seizure disorders. The THC oil can give a psychoactive effect to the people it's being administered to.

There is much confusion because the oils are derived from different parts of the same plant. Let's talk definitions for a minute. This article is a helpful guide to understanding the differences between Marijuana, Cannabis, and Hemp. Here is a basic explanation.

Marijuana

The definitions of what is classified as marijuana, cannabis or hemp is quite clear - at least according to the codes of the United States. In U.S. law, cannabis is the plant itself, and hemp and marijuana are specific parts of the plant. 

Hemp refers to the sterilized seeds, stems, stalks and roots. 

Marijuana is in reference to the viable seeds, leaves, and flowers.

While this is the easiest way to explain it, research has shown the differentiation between hemp marijuana goes much deeper, and their traditional names are not necessarily indicative of the true genetic makeup of these plants. Through trait-mapping and genotyping researchers have found the differences extend far beyond the genes involved in the production of THC.

Unfortunately, marijuana has come to be the all-in-one term for the cannabis plant and all of its useful parts. When one refers to marijuana or any of its other common names or derivatives (Mary Jane, pot, hash, hashish, whacky-tobacky, etc.) they are referring to the leaves and flowering portions of the plant that contain many cannabinoids, which have both mental and physical effects on the human body when ingested. Marijuana with these effects is produced on cannabis plants with greater than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the psychoactive portion of the plant. Some strains can go up to as much as 20 percent. Concentrations of THC are largely dependent on how it is ingested as well. The average for marijuana is 1-5 percent, 5-10 percent for hashish and 20 percent for hashish oil.

THC oil is something completely different than CBD oil and is typically used for those with cancer to help combat the horrific side effects that can happen during treatment like debilitating nausea, lack of appetite, migraines and general pain. Studies are showing that THC has been nothing short of a miracle for some with seizure disorders. The THC oil will give a psychoactive effect to the people its being administered to. 

Hemp

The recreational use of the cannabis plant to produce a "high" has overshadowed the myriad of industries that hemp is viable for and this is precisely how and why the plant has and continues to receive such bad press. Hemp comes from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC.

CBD oil is typically used to help with anxiety, depression, brain fog, pain, inflammation, low energy, sleep issues, and provide a general sense of well being.


Looking at the Law

Federal law defines industrial hemp as follows 

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/08/12/2016-19146/statement-of-principles-on-industrial-hemp

Industrial hemp
The term “industrial hemp” means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. In order for a CBD oil to be considered THC free according to the federal standard, it must contain no more than 0.3%. (source)

If any oil has more THC than that it can not be shipped to all 50 states per the Agricultural Act. 

RESOURCES:

https://www.projectcbd.org/about/cannabis-facts/sourcing-cbd-marijuana-industrial-hemp-vagaries-federal-law


http://www.cbdweb.org/medical-cannabis-guide/hemp-vs-marijuana-vs-cannabis

https://ministryofhemp.com/made-from-hemp/cbd/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4_CQ50OtUA&feature=youtu.be

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